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20121201
20121231
STATION
KQED (PBS) 11
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
like "stoned love," those were really wonderful. it is hard to say which ones. tavis: when diana ross left the group, what made you continue? you took it up to 1977. and diana ross left in 1970. >> what happened was i always say this. we wanted - dared to dream and we made our dreams come true even though we were in an infirmary where it was impossible dream. for black people to dare to dream. i think what happened to me after flo and diana was there, i realized i enjoyed what i was doing and what to do the rest of my life. -- wanted to do the rest of my life. i was happy when berry brought in gene. i stayed cause i love being on stage. i feel so blessed that i am doing something everything -- time i wake up, i am happy. i am a happy person. that is why i continued on hoping i could develop my talent and people would like me. now, to answer your question. let's talk about this. now i am doing things that i really love. i the supreme songs but i am -- she did the hits and that is what i am still going on. i have learned how to sing jazz. i say learned how to sing because this is what i
, ross mercurimi -- >> the year got off to a rough start for san francisco's new sheriff, ross mercurimi, facing domestic abuse charges and a suspension. throughout the year, politics took center stage, the presidential election the main event, starting with eight serious republican candidates vying for the nomination. ethnic voters flexed their political muscle, giving president obama an unexpectedly early election night win over republican rival mitt romney. california's public education system was saved from severe budget cuts with the november passage of governor brown's proposition 30, but voters didn't say yes to all taxes. an attempt to tax soda in richmond failed, as did a statewide tobacco tax on the june ballot. new districts drawn by a citizens commission and the voter-approved top two primary system shook up races for congress and the state legislature, putting a record number of freshmen in the assembly and giving democrats a rare supermajority in sacramento. it was the beginning of realignment of the state's criminal justice system, and voters approved reform of the state's
and this playlist you have given the world? >> i think it came on a whole different john ross -- different genre of music. we usually played black music, and i guess it just molded into a thing like that. tavis: what is fascinating when you say unapologetically you played black music, soul music, and that is what you did so well, but when you talk in the book about even though you are playing black music, you have a black drummer, and because of the presence of the black drummer, you caught for having a black drummer even though you were playing -- you caught hell for having a black rubber even though you were playing black music. they love the music. new -- for having of black -- a black drummer even though you were playing black music. >> we got in all kinds of trouble. i hate to name places. they said, we will serve you, but we are not going to serve that big n word. i was so embarrassed. i wanted to tell her, take that restaurant, and stick it -- we always said, do not worry about it. tavis: there is a wonderful quote in the back of the book. the music was so important, we just wanted to pla
because of his relationship with sara ross, who keithrick describes as being his older sister at school. >> she helped me with my school work, she helped me with school problems and all that type of stuff-- like say if for instance if i get put out of class she'll walk me around the school and sit down and well talk and she'll bring me back to class and i'll get back and do my work. >> reporter: ross, a baton rouge native, is in her second year at broadmoor, helping to lead the corps members here on their mission. >> we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> reporter: but diplomas now also works to address more serious student problems that may go beyond the scope of what either school officials or city year can handle. >> those things that might be affecting their physical or mental health, such as suicidal ideas, loss of a parent or a loved one, incarceration of a parent, mental health diagnosis, physical health diagnosis all those things so it runs the >> reporte
was in the back of the end zone, and the coaches and i were somewhere right in here. >> narrator: todd ross is a certified athletic trainer who is at every football practice and game at the private school will james attends. he was on the field when will collapsed. >> he made it to about the five-yard line. picked him up, and we started to carry him towards that gate. we got him into the junior high locker room because it was the closest locker room. since he was unconscious, we opted for putting him in the shower and dumping ice on him, after we had started to slow down his... lower his body temperature. >> there should never, ever be a person die from exertional heatstroke, because it's 100% survivable. >> narrator: doug casa is a leading expert on heatstroke. >> the key to surviving exertional heatstroke is what you do in the first five to ten minutes. you have to minimize the amount of time that the athlete is hyperthermic. it basically comes down to somewhere between around 105 to 106 degrees, how many minutes are you above this critical threshold for cell damage will impact whether th
skillful treasury secretary took him two years with people like bill bradley and dan ross ten you couldski, that takes a long time. but they can at least adopt those numbers right now. and i really think they were close. and they may be close again. but right now it's just a turnoff. >> rose: this country has been going through enormous mourning for what happened to 20 young people in flutown, connecticut. has it changed anything here? specifically i want to get to the gun debate but generally a sense of, look, we've got to pull together on some things here. we've got to get beyond our dysfunction. >> i think people feel differently about this one than most of the other terrible tragedies we've seen. with the little children, the awfulness of it. whether that endures. whether that really means there will be action on-- i'm not sure, charlie. but i do think there is more of a shock. there is more of a sense. and you talk to republicans and democrats. and i think that one thing that i think the president did skillfully was putting joe biden in charge of doing something about this. because bi
communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org [ chimes rattling ] >> ross: if you need me, call me. >> [ cheering and applause ] >> no matter where you are, no matter how far, just call my name. i'll be there in a hurry. on that, you can depend and neve >> man: right now, though, a cloud, a literal one, is hanging over the packed crowd as a severe thunderstorm watch -- >> woman: this'll be an event, the kind of thing you tell your grandchildren about. >> man: this is a landscape of humanity -- not thousands, hundreds of thousands --
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)